"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

Hello Friends!

Friends, Romans, countrymen...y'all. Foodies, gardeners, artists and collectors - let's gather together to share and possibly learn a thing or two in the mix.

Donna Baker

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Lime Time


My Persian lime tree produced twenty limes this fall.  My first crop I might add.  You notice all the peelers.  I have even more.  You see, to make limoncello (I don't even know what you'd call limoncello made from limes), one must peel only the surface rind. It is hard to find a peeler that works well. No white pith as it will ruin the batch.  





I poured a very strong grain alcohol into a jar with the peels.  After a few weeks in a cool, dark place, the peels will snap like a potato chip.  Then, I'll add a sugar syrup and bottle it up and into the freezer.  It will grow hair on your chest.  I rarely drink it, but instead, give it away.



Not so for my lime juice.


I freeze it in little cubes and bag it up for when I need smaller amounts.


Voila!

20 comments:

  1. Wow, it looks pretty !
    I love the idea of dividing it up in little ice-cube portions, how clever deary ;)
    Your tree has produced well for you.
    ~Jo

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    1. Jo, it's my only lime tree so I'm tickled. Many more lemons to come in a month or so. I still have juice from last year's crop. The greenhouse is finished and our tropical plants are going inside this weekend.

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  2. We've never had citrus trees, and I love the idea of picking the luscious fruit right off your own plant. We're lime people, more than lemon, though lemons were what we used all these years, and mighty tasty they were, too.

    I've always wondered about the lure of the delectable "pickled limes" of the March sisters, and which got the unfortunate Amy into such trouble. The only recipes I've seen are limes layered in salt until they weep, and that's making my tongue curl. I cannot imagine biting into one, though tiny flicks sliced thin to tart up a dish or cut the sweet/richness of others might be nice.

    Would one of the microplane graters do the job easier, for they shower down thinthin shreds of peel with no white at all unless you go too far. And they would strain out easily, I think. But I much prefer a lovely thin slice of lime peel dropped into a pitcher of tea, or rubbed around the inside of a glass, just below the rim, to squeezing a wedge into my glass.

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    1. I have preserved lemons and salt, but I don't have a tagine and never used them. I don't cook that much anymore. The limoncello/limencello is what I call cough medicine. I tell everyone that it works wonders for that. In fact, this stuff will bring you to your knees it is so strong. I think if you drank more than a thimble full, it might shut down your liver. Definitely want a designated driver.

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  3. Great post Donna. I have made it many times with lemons - will have to try it with limes next time!

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  4. You are so clever about these things. I forget sometimes that we can freeze most everything. I love limoncello from Sorrento - no hair on the chest yet. Limes are sweeter and should give a more gentle brew?! My favorite dessert of late is a limoncello sorbet. I get it in a restaurant but you should be able to concoct some, Donna!

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    1. I saw a spot on tv once about the lemons grown in Sorrento. They shade the trees with burlap. I just don't have many tastebuds for alcohol. I cannot stand beer and have never tasted a wine that I love as of yet. I've heard that green lemons make the most delicious limoncello; a smoother brew. Tastes like gasoline to me.

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  5. Hello, donna baker.

    Great photographing. Design, composition and ideas. Very sweet atmosphere.

    Greetings and hugs.

    Have a good weekend. From Japan, ruma❃

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  6. Oh Donna - these limes look beautiful. Ah to have a tree in the backyard that provides such great fruit. Had to smile about how you give that strong drink away and keep the lime juice for yourself. I think I would do the same! Have a great week-end. Thanks too for stopping to visit me. I always love it when you do.

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  7. Now that is a novel concept - lime-cello! I love the lemon version so would definitely enjoy sampling the lime.

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  8. If Limoncello is made with lemons..then maybe lemoncello! :)
    My husband ..son -in-laws and one of my daughters love this)

    Limoncello that is.
    Lucky you Donna!

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    1. Wish I could share it with you Monique.

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  9. Oh my heavens, that looks delicious and so refreshing!

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    1. Sara, I am eager to try the lime one. Wonder if it will be different from the lemon ones. I have made liqueurs from many different fruits. Wonder what my grapefruit would taste like, but by then, I'd be a serious alcoholic.

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  10. I am so proud of you for growing limes! I'd never even attempt it. Now, Is this Limoncello a potent type of BOOZE? If so, it must be the best tasting liquor ever, but I best stick with my favorite, Limeade.

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    1. Yes Jeri, it is like 100 proof and I really think it is better for a cough medicine, but the Italians drink it as a digestive aid and of course they must like it. I said earlier, I think it tastes more like lemon gasoline, but I am just not a drinker I guess. My lemons, tangerines, blood oranges, grapefruits, et al will be ready in a month or so. I just got carried away with citrus.

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  11. I'm so curious about how this tastes. You know, I love my limoncello, especially over peaches, plums and berries. I wonder what this would be like over the same fruit ... maybe honeydew ... :)

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    1. I'll let you know Lucinda. As much time as you spend in Italy, I bet you are an expert. I kind of liked the crema con limoncello.

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  12. Love this! And how did your limencello turn out?! I had my first limoncello in the Cinque Terre in Italy, one of those tiny tourist bottles but we loved it so got a larger one to bring home. I think it sat there for years (tho we had a little.) Can't wait to find out what you do with the limes.

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  13. Turned out well. If you add a little heavy cream and drink it very cold, it is a little more palatable.

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