"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

Hello Friends!

Friends, Romans, countrymen...y'all. Foodies, gardeners, artists and collectors - let's gather together to share and possibly learn a thing or two in the mix.

Donna Baker

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Old Cupboard


One of the first things I learned about antiques was by doing it the hard way.  Each and every time I have to strip and refinish a piece, I say never again.  On this old step back cupboard, I learned they often used different types of wood on furniture pieces and thus, they had to be painted.

I don't know my woods very well, but this cupboard was oak and other woods and weighs a ton.  So, after stripping it, I had to paint it to cover it up since the woods didn't match.  I decided to try a trompe l'oile with a speckled blue graniteware top, then painted tea towels on the side.  


Painted the inside black and the front of the cabinets too.


Nesting doves.


Some hanging herbs and the metal farm set I got at a Paris flea market.  Have always loved them, but wonder about that purchase now.  Anyway.


Basket of apples on the other door.


But my favorite part was this note tacked on the side of the cupboard.  I got a kick out of it back when I painted it, but now, it might not be so funny anymore. 

This went well at the farm, but does not go in the city house.  My son says he wants it someday, but evidently not in the near future.  It is now in the guest room and I wonder how long it will remain?  Forever is my guess.

24 comments:

  1. It's a beautiful piece, did you paint all the cupboard doors ? They are spectacular.
    I'd enjoy looking at it a little longer, it's a whimsical piece, I bet the children would enjoy it....
    Hugs,
    ~Jo

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    1. Oh yes, Jo, my dear friend. As I said, after stripping then having to figure out what next... I hate to sell it in a yard sale. Thank you and hope you're improving everyday.

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  2. Love the hardware and the patina. Well, the chips and nicks. You gave it a good country grounding with your paints!

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    1. I tried Joanne, but the never again rule still applies.

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  3. Wow. It is a stunning looking piece. And reminds me that I have a partially restored piece down in the garage that I *should* get to. Soon. Ish.

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    1. Uh oh Child. It's a dirty job, isn't it?

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  4. What a fabulous painted piece. So much fun.
    It is beautiful.

    cheers, parsnip

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  5. Wowza, Woman! Trompe L'oeil indeed! In my glasses-less state as I sat down to put on my socks and have my Chris-insists First Cup delivered charmingly to my coaster, I certainly was fooled by the cup-towels hanging against the black. It's exactly how anything looks draped across the round steel handle of Miss Frankie's wide-hipped oven. And I enlarged the photo, hoping to better "read" the words. I just KNEW the five little squares must be letters, spelling FLOUR in that distinct red and Federally blue that three-quarters of the embroidery patterns of that day called for. Didn't we thread up those little needles with two-or-three strands of that distinctive blue hue, stitching sunbonnets and edgings and sailboats across pillowslips and dresser scarves and doilies for chair arms and coffeetables? (All of my childhood ones had the distinction of having a neat border crocheted on in corresponding colours by my Memphis Mammaw on her quarter-visits once a year. Some of the pillowslip edgings lie up in the linen-press today, wrapped like fancy ropes in the cut-off-and-enveloped ends of other old pillowslips, waiting to be sewn on yet another of decades-in-succession of fresh pairs of Westpoint Pepperell's finest. ANd I run then through my fingers sometimes, remembering that particular variegated purple thread, and wasn't that also a part of the fancy crocheted Flower Basket, starched within an inch of its life with a Sugar-Water stiffener, and standing proud on the dining table that time that Baby Sis got into the room and chewed those sweet proud ruffles into a disastrous heap, leaving a scatter of Jonquils and dogwood across the Battenburg, just as the Missionary Society ladies were due to arrive for tea.

    And I have no words for the rest---I'm reminded every time of your talented hand and eye, and the way you SEE things and draw a line around them and there they are. Boggled here, for my Box of 96 holds my only creative gene---I leave it in there for safekeeping when the Grands go home, so I won't lose THAT as well as all those glasses and keys gone down the Rabbit-Hole of succeeding years.

    But GIEL!! You DO beat all!

    r

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    1. Boy Rachel, you sure know a lot about doilies and lace etc. I have a few myself, but have never seen anyone in my family sew anything. My husband's family crocheted and made quilts, but I can't sew a straight line. That was cutwork you were trying to see. I'm surprised I know what that is. Thank you dear.

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  6. Donna, that is one fantastic cupboard! Your artistry and wit totally transformed the item you purchased into something quite remarkable. Hoping that you will be able to keep it "in the family."

    I know what you mean about how much some such old wooden items can weigh. When I moved into a SoHo loft back in the 1970s, I had to pay a "fixture fee" to the prior tenant covering the improvements she'd made to sort make the loft into a livable space. She also included an antique baker's hutch, which weighed a ton and had been painted with white enamel. When I moved from the loft, I did take the hutch with me, and eventually removed the paint. It's still a very solid piece of furniture and provides lots of storage space with a certain style.

    xo

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    1. Was it all made from the same wood Frances? I think it will have to stay in the guest bedroom forever. I usually have Christmas houses stored behind the glass doors, but they are packed away. Somewhere. Thank you Frances.

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    2. I think my baker's cabinet is all oak. and it has a slide out enameled tray, a built in sifter in one compartment (I've never used it for sifting) and interesting hinges and closures. I'll try to send you a photo...soonish, revealing lots of my clutter.
      xo

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    3. Yes, I know what you are talking about Frances. I have one at the barn, but it has been painted a baby blue. I has a roll top front and a sifter, but it is pretty lightweight. Hope I can sell it at the booth if I ever get enough room.

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  7. LOL I like that cabinet I have seen kitchen cabinets painted similar to it. Leave the note for sure LOl

    You have me all stirred up over you selling buttons LOL my sister gave me some great ones,I guess that is my thing now and I still love my dishes that I find

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    1. I think you and I are alike. We like everything.

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  8. I absolutely love it Donna - so imaginative and creative.

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    1. Pat, so sweet of you to say. Thank you.

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  9. 'To fool the eye' is such a fantastic expression. I love your renderings of the tea towels, herbs, etc. Initially, I was fooled as I thought the towels were real! So fun.

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    1. Used to do trompe l'oeil, but not so much anymore. Thank you Bea.

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  10. It's beautiful!

    Donna I have a very old cabinet w/ slanted secretary top..when stripped it was not wonderful ..a local artist painted something for me..I will never part w/ it..it's in the basement..in the family room and I store all our photo albums and such in it..:) I love these pieces..I'll take a pic one day:)

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    1. Thank you Monique. I'd love to see your cabinet.

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  11. Wow Donna this is a gorgeous piece. Your art work is fabulous. I surely think it should be somewhere special in your home.

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  12. Thank you Deb. My new mantra is nothing bigger than a bread box. I'm not going to put it by the curb (cause it's too Heavy!)

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