"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

Hello Friends!

Friends, Romans, countrymen...y'all. Foodies, gardeners, artists and collectors - let's gather together to share and possibly learn a thing or two in the mix.

Donna Baker

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Peek


I know this is bizarre.  About fifty years ago, in Japan, they made these little taxidermy chicks and ducks.  I have no idea why but I have a few of them that I bought at flea markets.  This little one is peeping out of my new display table and a duckling sits in the back.


I added a few more 'treasures' to my display table.  The two carved objects just up from the old wallet, are arrow shapers.  Native American indians each had them and the shape and markings were carved into the pottery.  It was how they told which ones were their own.  The shapers had a hole through the center and the indians would put them over a stick and go back and forth, sanding and shaping their arrows.  From where I got them, I think they are from the Muscogee Creek Nation.

The little hand made soft leather doll just above is in an indian style dress.  The thunderbird inlay necklace to the left was made by a SW indian tribe, but I can't remember which one right now.  They made them for the tourist trade and used old 78 records to cut up for a firm base and template then used coral and turquoise and other stones for decoration.

The tiny basket to the left of it is Cherokee.  The black basket just above it is made from horsehair and has a lid on it.  Can't remember that tribe at the moment.  Two little arrowheads sit just to the left of the baskets, but the thing above is a medicine bag.  I opened it once and it was full of different plant materials.

I had a friend once and her step-father, a full blood Choctaw indian, used to have these little bags tucked under cushions and beds; all over the house.  She said he would take hair from their hairbrushes and wrap it around bones and things to make good medicine and keep bad medicine away from them.  





29 comments:

  1. I love your box of treasures - so tactile! (And I did think the chicks were real :))

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    1. I can't imagine why they made them, but they are very lifelike.

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  2. Such a weird and wonderful collection. So much better to be able to display them instead of them being stuck in a drawer. A cabinet of curiosities.

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  3. I like the oddity of this collection.

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    1. It is strange and wonderful what objects people find intriguing.

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  4. lots of cool stuff in there. family legend has it that my paternal great grandfather was 1/4 native american. cherokee maybe. my sister and I are thinking about getting one of those swab dna tests to see if it bears out.

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    1. That would be neat. They have large books of names of Cherokees in Talequah, OK, the seat of the Cherokee Nation.

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  5. So many treasures.
    The taxidermy chicks make me uncomfortable, but I know it was quite common. Victorian women often wore stuffed birds on their hats. Different times...

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    1. Yes, I saw the most beautiful cobalt blue bird, which I'm certain is extinct now as I have never seen one, on an old ladies' hat at a Beacon Hill antique shop in Boston. I have posted before about the decimation of bird species during Marie Antoinette's heyday. Everyone wanted to be like her and wear feathered hats.

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  6. The chick looks quite lively after all this time. I like the assortment & imagine I see a tiny witch's broom... :)

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    1. Bea, I have two and guess they were for little doll houses long ago, or maybe a little witch fairy's broomstick.

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  7. I love tiny treasures:0 I am coveting the turquoise at the moment since I am bangled in it now..fake though..mine.
    The chick is priceless there..Love the leather bound piece..

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    1. It is the oldest wallet I've seen. Probably handmade.

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  8. Replies
    1. I put peep first, then changed it to peek since the little chick is looking out the front of the glass.

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  9. I love these tiny treasures Donna - they look so interesting in a display cabinet.

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    1. Oh thank you Pat. I do enjoy small things and natural history.

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  10. What an attractive collection. Strange peep though.

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    1. I saw a television show one time, and a zoo in Japan had a crocodile exhibit and instead of buying a bag of peanuts to feed the elephant, the onlookers were tossing baby chicks into the water to feed the crocs. My son was so upset as here on the farm, he played and raised our baby fowl. Guess it's the different culture.

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  11. What a wonderful selection of vintage items Donna although the jury is out on the taxidermy !!!! XXXX

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  12. Now this is just the sort of post that I love! Your objects tell me of a culture and experience so different from anything that I know. I've just written a post about some of my 'stuff' and a year or so back completed a blog that describes my life in one hundred objects. I would be so interested if you were to do the same. (I pinched the idea from the former director of the British Museum who produced a programme and book entitled, 'The History of the World in One Hundred Objects.)

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    1. That does sound very interesting. I said in an earlier post that I am more of a snips and snails sort than sugar and spice gal. I guess in reality, I just love it all.

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  13. I looked all over for taxidermy chicks and could find nary a one. Last year when a duckling died, I put it in the freezer for future use. There is a company that freeze dries them, no more taxidermy for tiny things like that. I'm doing a taxidermy post next week that will surprise people. I like that little broom, what is the story behind that?

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    1. I have a couple Jeri. I think they were with salesman samples or made for doll houses a long long time ago. If I find more, I'll pick one up for you.

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    2. PS ~ I meant the baby chicks,

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  14. Donna - just love seeing all your treasures. Did I spy a small hummingbird nest at the top? Have only seen one up close once. Your Indian pouch and thunder bird necklace are wonderful artifacts. So glad you shared.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed seeing them Deb. I don't know why, but I find many hummer nests and have had many little hummers too. Dead and dried up, but precious to me.

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