"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

Hello Friends!

Friends, Romans, countrymen...y'all. Foodies, gardeners, artists and collectors - let's gather together to share and possibly learn a thing or two in the mix.

Donna Baker

Monday, January 30, 2012

Lemon As Medicine




Some of my lemons for this past year.  Meyer is what I grow the most of, but I also grow softball-sized Ponderosa and football-sized Etrog (the nubby one in the bottom right picture).  I recently happened across a spot on tv where a man who makes healthy juice concoctions on the streets of Jerusalem said the most important juice of all was that of the Etrog so I researched it.  Appears that the Etrog, aka the Persian Apple, is prized in the mid-east for its medicinal qualities.  With over 70 medicinal chemicals, it is used for its juice and zest in cooking.  Cultivated back in 4000 BC, it was also known as the Paradise Apple as it was believed to be the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden.  Today, it is used in the Jewish festival of Sukkot.  I know very little about keeping kosher, but in reading about Etrog (pronounced atrog) the fruit has to be unblemished, grown from actual tree, not a seed or cutting, and in fields that are watched over under strict observation by rabbis.  The lemon therefore must be used from a tree called/considered Hadar, named in the Torah from the days of Moses.  Wow!

Known for an antidote for snakebite, a cure for seasickness, and used as an antibiotic in times past, some other lemon remedies are used for:

Constipation
Reduction of body fat
mouth ulcers and throat infections
stomach upsets
cold relief

Lemons have also proved to be a blessing for  mountaineers.  In the case of insufficient oxygen or difficulty  in breathing, lemon comes to the rescue. Sir Edmund Hillary has admitted that his victory over Mount Everest was greatly due to lemon.

I think I'll grow more Etrogs this year.


10 comments:

  1. I should have used more lemons when I lived in Colorado, a mile high....sometimes I couldn't catch my breath.
    I didn't know the lemon had so many uses, I shall research more.
    Yours are so lovely, little and big and in between ;)
    ~Jo

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  2. The addition of lemons into almost anything seems to freshen the tastebuds too....I buy bags of lemons and limes every time i shop....You are so lucky to be able to grow hem. i just bought Meyer lemons last week...i had never seen them before in Canada....it said they were a cross between a lemon and a mandarin orange!

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  3. The Meyer is my favorite; is more fruity. The Ponderosa is salty sour and the Etrog, moreso, a sour bitter taste. You would be able to grow them indoors where you live. With full sun in the summer, then inside in a greenhouse or sunny window when the temps get below 45 degrees.

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  4. My mother used to drink lemon juice and water to start or finish the day. I like the idea but never keep it up. This is encouragement!

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  5. I have heard so many great things about lemons ... esp. in regards to health benefits. Bonus that they are lovely to look at!

    xxCat

    ps. Trying to wrap my head around what a football sized lemon would be like ... WOW!

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  6. You have an amazing blog. Just beautiful!!
    Smiles, Dottie

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  7. Hello, donna baker.

      The coldest winter will be melted by your warm heart.
      The works gently accept all visitors.

      I praise your creative art sense.
      The prayer for all peace.
      
      Have a good weekend.
    From Japan, ruma ❃

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  8. I cannot believe you grew those beautiful lemons. They are beautiful. I have come across anyone growing them except big producers. What do you do with your lemons (now don't come back with that lemonade stuff - Ha! - even though I'm sure you do). I would love to have a lemon tree and go pickin.

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  9. Oh I love lemons (and limes) for the color, taste and smell. Good for you YES! Do you grow lemons in your house or greenhouse! I would love to do that.

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  10. Jill, they sit out in full sun from late spring until fall when the temps go under 40 degrees. Then I haul them into the greenhouse. They are really easy to grow.

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