"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

Hello Friends!

Friends, Romans, countrymen...y'all. Foodies, gardeners, artists and collectors - let's gather together to share and possibly learn a thing or two in the mix.

Donna Baker

Monday, September 21, 2015

Season Of Change












As you can see from the above pictures and my newest header photo, I am quite the gardener.  I try to do it all and have gardened for the past thirty or so years.  

This summer has been different.  The weather was awful.  I lost many fruit trees and the blackberry vines died back. I really don't know what happened to them.  The garden struggled along and many of the crops failed (even the re-plantings.)  That, and with my husband being too sick to help, I got little to nothing from the garden.  

It is such hard work to then get nothing in return.  I can no longer crawl around nor bend down for long periods; the most I can do is scoot along on my bottom.  I think the time has come.  If it isn't in a raised bed, it won't get planted.  The weeding alone is nearly an insurmountable task.  Everything does taste better from your own garden though and isn't covered in chemicals.  

My new house has very little room for vegetable gardening.  Maybe a few pots here and there.  I've been calling it a cottage, but I looked up that definition and it really isn't.  My style of decorating is cottage style, or in reality, eclectic I'd say.  

It is funny about buying a new home.  I had to have a large lot (no neighbors too close) with privacy, no carpeting, no garage doors taking up the front part of the house, and on and on.  So, all that went out the window when I saw the new house.  You can't get everything you want unless you build your own house and I am way past that stage of life.  So, changeability seems to be the catchphrase for me.   Think I will have to have a vegetable garden at my daughter's house.  Seems I'll have to hold on for the ride in this new phase of life where plans change just as soon as they are made.

26 comments:

  1. Oh, LAW, Miss Donna!

    It that's "little to nothing" of this year's crop, it's still a stunner! Those slick muddy potatoes are like gold nuggets unearthed from their secret bed, and all the other gorgeous things---if you tell me those are Kentucky Wonders, I will die, faint, AND fail, right here and now. And what kind of peas? Zippers, maybe? Crowders would be too much sugar for a dime.

    I could plan whole meals around just the beans, and I can smell that shucky-dry oniony smell from here---we used to put several bushels on old screen doors on even-more-ancient sawhorses, under what had been the "egg sheds" when my In-Laws had formerly had a great flock of layin' hens. It was like a rich treasure trove to have those onions and big heads of garlic and several kinds of taters all just resting out there, free to pick and choose all you wanted.

    Those old utensils are priceless works of art---do you call that a chopper, a mezzaluna, or an Ulu? I think it all depends on where your family got the first one, as to what you name it. And the lidded ladle---I've never imagined one of those.

    I do hope your Dear Hubby is better soon, to enjoy that sweet new home you're creating. You do know that some of the most beautiful art you've ever shown is those grimy hands full of bounty.

    r

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    1. Dear Rachel, all of the fruits from the garden shown are from previous years. Like I said, very little from this year. I always braided the onions and hung them in the shade. The utensils were purchased, but did come in handy for those hard crabapples. The gardens and farm animals will be what I miss most. That and the stars.

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  2. Gardening is definitely not as easy as it was..I have tomove things this year..like soon..and I just can't muster the will yet:(

    Digging is the pits pardon the expression..You have quite a bounty regardless Donna!

    You made me smile about what your new house had to have and what went out the window;)We built 4 times..

    you still end up w/ a wish I would have done this..or that..
    my wish for the one we in now that I never want to leave?
    I wish we would have built much smaller..and it's not big .
    I was 47..J 60.. now 61and 74..

    things change..people should have told me..;)
    I swear I never noticed..till it was us..

    Have fun!!

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    1. And they change on a daily basis now. Perhaps we didn't know things because our mothers died young and no one told us. We'll just have to fly by the seat of our pants.

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  3. Congratulations on your new house! We have moved so many times in the last 10 years that I haved lost count. Each time it feels more difficult than the last. At the moment, we are neck deep in a remodel. It is far easier to build from the ground up!
    I had the same experience with my garden his year. First, too much rain, then not enough. Felt like too much of a struggle. Raised beds are definitely in my future.
    Sorry to hear of your husbands illness. It can be so frustrating to try and get the correct diagnosis.

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    1. Thank you Ry and so glad to hear from you. Your my hero moving that many times. It is taking its toll, but have a quiet week before closing next week on new house. Hubby is pretty sick this week so it is a struggle. Waiting for his doctor to call now.

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  4. Yes Donna, I think you are quite right - when we move we are absolutely certain what we want and then suddenly we
    see a house which may or may not fit our specifications and yet we know it is the right one for us.

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    1. I couldn't believe how all those wants went right out the window when I saw this house. I just hope the neighbors are good ones. With wrought iron fences around the property, I'm now worried my weenie, Sister, might bite them if they try to pet her through the fence. Can you imagine me knocking on the new neighbor's door and then having to tell them not to stick their hands through the fence to try and pet Sister. What a way to meet the new neighbors.

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  5. It's either raised beds or grandchildren for me. Neighbors have offered to hire my granddaughters to look after their gardens and I laugh. Mine only got so good with supervision. They do good work, but only under directon.
    I hope you do find a place for raised beds. My friend's daughter moved into a new house, and after much consideration turned her front yard into a garden. The city cited her. She tore it up and kept on harvesting. That was last year. This year her very prolific front yard garden was not cited.

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    1. Isn't that crazy. One of my lists don'ts was no neighborhood associations. Told you. It all went out the window on this house. I've lived in the country so long with no neighbors - well, I told the kids I'll have to make sure and not walk outside naked.

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  6. Donna, I am paying very close attention to all that you share with us about your move. All that you express (and lots more to be gleaned from comments) is very valuable information for me.

    As I continue to contemplate leaving my city views for an as yet unidentified location, I hope to absorb lots of wisdom vicariously.

    Raised beds must be a great solution to form following function.

    xo

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    1. Frances, like in the movie (I can't remember the name), rent a property for a few months and try it out. I have had friends tell me they would never spend a night out here alone and yet I go outside at night all of the time. It is not for everyone. I've heard people that live in the city can't stand the quiet, yet I love that. It really depends on the person. It will be hard to leave, but I am ready to live in the city. If only our farm weren't so far from the city, it would be perfect.

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    2. Donna, thank you once again for your wise words.

      It's going to be interesting to follow what you will comment on as your move to the city. xo

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  7. Donna, I hope so much your hubby will be feeling better very soon.
    Yes, this summer everywhere seemed endless, and so hot - but especially here in the south. I know what you mean about vegetable gardening - it's such a lot of work and sometimes the return is disappointing. This year, no veggies here, we were traveling too much and couldn't ask the neighbors to water. As for blooms, not many of those either - only the figs did well and I was grateful for them!

    Take care and be extra careful when moving day comes.
    Thanks for your comments - we'll be off on Thurs.

    Hugs - Mary

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    1. Have a wonderful trip. And, thank you for your sentiments.

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  8. I'm ready to hear of your adventures in this new house you connected with so quickly. I know you will make things grow - maybe in another way. Good luck with sorting -ugh - packing and the move!

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    1. Gesbi, so glad to hear from you. Haven't seen your posting in quite some time. Wonder if I'm not getting them. I'll have to check. Yes, I don't want to move anymore than I have to ever again.

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  9. Just a note to all my friends, my husband has gotten very ill and dealing with all that. New house closing amongst it all Oct. 1 so I'll be back after some time.

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  10. Donna, I've been on the` road and am just catching up with your endeavors. Your House closed, all packed and a farewell to the old garden. That must be a bit tough to say goodbye to all those memories....and fresh foods! It will be much easier for you to manage a bitty garden in your new place, of course. I often wonder how long I will be able to keep up with my 9 cottage gardens and a potager. By this time of the year, it all looks pretty tacky and disheveled, and I just don't care. Thank God for Autumn, I can forget about weeding. So, when do we get to peek at the new abode??!

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  11. PS, I was hoping your husband was feeling better, but I see from your last comment above that he is still quite sick. I am so sorry for that, and am sending you a tight hug and much strength.

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    1. Jeri, thank you so much. We still have the farm. I sold our city house and we close on the new city
      one Oct 1. Terry has been very ill; a perfect storm of conditions. I feared losing him last week till we had him transferred to the city hospital. We are still in the hospital and might have to close on new house at the hospital. I'll be back blogging when I can. Miss all of you.

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    2. Oh Donna:(
      I came to ask you how you were and just read this latest post..
      I was hoping he was doing much better.Cannot imagine everything you are going through..:(

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    3. Monique, love that you came to check on me. My husband had double pneumonia, was down to 100 lbs., very malnourished and dehydrated, plus the infectious disease. Just all went downhill at once. He got the feeding tube Monday and after a week will be out of hospital soon. Thank you again for your friendship and concern.

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    4. Poor you guys..
      :(
      Thinking of you...

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  12. Sorry about all the challenges life is throwing your way. I will be sending good thoughts your way.
    As far as the gardening ... yes, stick with the raised beds. My sister used old wine casks before she could do bigger raised beds.
    Sending hugs your way!

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    1. Thank you so Lucinda. Have missed you, but will go back to see your posts as I always so enjoy them.

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