"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

Hello Friends!

Friends, Romans, countrymen...y'all. Foodies, gardeners, artists and collectors - let's gather together to share and possibly learn a thing or two in the mix.

Donna Baker

Monday, February 20, 2017

It's A New Day


The old saw, nothing new under the sun, isn't true.  

Gone are the days of holding on to a tree and giving birth.  Today, they paint a painting with your placenta.  They then freeze dry it and grind it up and put it into capsules.  The bottle looks like something you'd purchase at the drug store.  Supposedly, it helps with nursing, postpartum depression and, whatever...

It is a different world we live in - a new day and age.

33 comments:

  1. Lots of birthing in the fields and often you see an eagle flying with a placenta.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow. Never saw that. Must be smart eagles to get to it before the raccoons, bobcats, etc.

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. My forties were my favorite years.

      Delete
    2. And, I forgot to say, my daughter is 39 and they called her a geriatric pregnancy patient, which upset my daughter to no end.

      Delete
    3. Wow. Already at 39? I wonder when our 'geriatric' birthing years begin?

      Delete
    4. Hey Bea. 35, which seems young nowadays, though glad it's not me.

      Delete
  3. That picture is a hand mirror, reflecting Life Going On.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is uncharted territory, yet much the same. I read your bio and we have much in common. Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  4. How interesting for me to read your post at this time as I have been working on a post about my first child birth! Yes, there are so many issues that we know more about today than in the past. And, most of it makes good sense to me, especially the hormone component. Wow, so little was understood in the 60's when my children were born. Having experienced RN pediatric training at Los Angeles County Hospital (before legal abortion) and working with crib after crib of babies living with devastating and unimaginable anomalies I experienced first hand the contrast to today's reality. Some times I wonder how I ever considered having children. My youth, optimism and strong faith gave me a foundation for living forward and having a family. Thank you for this post. I always look forward to see what you have to say.-Mary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You too Mary. I guess you are drenched and waiting for the sun to come out. I was thinking of CA this morning - drought and rain. Back several years ago, TX lost 200,000,000 trees due to severe drought. Your job must have been really interesting. I've always been interested in medicine and am currently researching stem cell research at UC Davis for severe dysphagia.

      Delete
  5. Replies
    1. My thought too Sandra. And, I'm whispering this, I don't think it works.

      Delete
    2. Grin:)
      You have a sunny colorful day, my friend.

      Delete
  6. I had never heard of this....interesting!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are in a new day. And, like I told Sandra, I don't think it works.

      Delete
  7. Something new every day. My daughter was so worried whether or not she should bank cord blood. Ultimately, it was just too expensive. Nowadays, it seems you are made to feel a little guilty if you decide not to do some of these newer trends. Who knows - I guess time will tell.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've heard of that Ry. Seems that was an insurance policy in case something happens. I'm with her. The expense wouldn't justify it.

      Delete
  8. Not so sure I like this at all. So very gaggy !

    cheers, parsnip

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In my day, it was plant a tree with it. I guess I could do it as long as I didn't have to cook and eat it.

      Delete
  9. When our first daughter was born in the early seventies the midwife took the placenta home to feed her grapevine. Sounded sensible to me! When I was born during the Second World War my father got leave from the army for my home birth. The midwife gave him the placenta and told him to bury it deep in the garden so that cats couldn't dig it back up.
    Times have indeed changed!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't that interesting Rosemary? Today, they probably wouldn't even give a pregnant soldier leave to deliver the baby. I love Call The Midwife. Here, they haven't been very common. Now they have something called a dhoula (not sure if that is the spelling nor what they do - la.)

      Delete
  10. Whaaaaaat?? I've heard of saving wedding cake, but never heard of saving the placenta or making images with it :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Amanda. Glad to hear from you. What you been up to? I know. It is a new day. They used the cord to make a heart that was dried and looks like a dog chew. Ewe.

      Delete
  11. I enjoyed Amanda's response...saving the wedding cake but not the placenta. Heh, heh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. See above reply Sandra. I guess you are supposed to hang it on a Christmas tree or something. I like the old indian way. They saved the belly button after it dried and fell off, then put it in a leather pouch shaped like their spirit animal and completely beaded it. Those were beautiful.

      Delete
    2. I prefer the shaped like their animal spirit too. I'd love to know how they figured out their animal spirit. Or was it a vision?

      Delete
    3. I'd have to research that Sandra. Owls are bad luck for the Cherokees and other tribes have their bad omens. It is probably passed down through generations and/or something that came on the day they were born. Simple superstitions, but strong magic to them. I have an old indian medicine bag. I just had to open it to see what was inside. It was all plant materials.

      Delete
  12. oh ick. I do not think women of the past ate their placenta. I know animals do and that's probably where some bonehead got the idea but still, ick. and the painting? really? no thanks. all that said, when I gave birth and the doctor held up the placenta for me to see I thought it was really kind of beautiful but I felt no desire to eat it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha. I was shocked by how big they were when I saw mine. Like a big flat liver and it was gross to look at. I like the idea of planting it with a tree.

      Delete
  13. Wow ... I've never seen such a thing. But, Why not? Looks very cool!
    Hope you are well. Thanks for your comment on my post. It was quite the adventure.

    Big blessings to you and your family! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You too Lucinda. Love to hear about your adventures. Take care.

      Delete

Someone said comments are the heartbeat of blogs. I love to read your comments and learn so much from every one of you. Thanks for taking the time to talk to me.