"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

Hello Friends!

Friends, Romans, countrymen...y'all. Foodies, gardeners, artists and collectors - let's gather together to share and possibly learn a thing or two in the mix.

Donna Baker

Friday, July 24, 2015

Turtle Time


It's turtle time again at the farm.  You can see how exciting a life I lead here.  Be that as it may, I do get a kick out of feeding the fish and turtles every evening at one of the ponds.  I have many water turtles there, but the meany snapping turtles have become quite bold.  Before I knew it the other eve, one had sped out of the water and was two feet away from my feet before I noticed it.  There is a male and female.  And, they love leftovers.  I called them meanies because they usually only like live baby fish that are waiting for me at the edge of the pond when I arrive and they are considered an aggressive species.  Their ancestor, the Alligator Snapping Turtle, can weigh 250 lbs. but thankfully I don't have any of those in my ponds.  They usually stay in streams and rivers.


They can stick their necks out very far and I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder.




Here is a young Red Eared Slider turtle coming for a snack.  There are many of these in the pond.  Unlike the box or land turtles around, their feet are much larger and webbed for swimming.  Some of them have become very friendly and used to me while others float offshore with their heads above the water waiting for me to toss slices of bread their way.


This one decided to try Thai noodles.


When the other one appeared, it decided to score the chicken tender and quickly swam away with it.


So many cute creatures at the farm right now.  Tiny tree frogs, peepers and toads about the size of your little fingernail are everywhere.  I wonder how many we've squished.  A box turtle was feasting on some of the fallen peaches this morning and of course, the crows were calling me.  I was watering all the potted plants, it was 8:00 am and I was sweating like a pig.  It will be 100 degrees today and I won't be going out again until this evening to feed.

20 comments:

  1. Raspberries! You're feeding those turtles raspberries? They should kiss you on the lips in gratitude.

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    1. They were mushy Joanne. It was funny though that the turtle made a beeline for the raspberries first.

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  2. What a feast you are feeding these turtles..I love when a sand turtle comes and sees us in Fl..:) They live in the wild sea oats:)
    And..that's my kind of excitement!

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    1. Just leftovers. My husband doesn't like leftovers but the turtles do.

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  3. They are quite cute Donna and, I think that they eat better than me !!!! Can I come and live next door to you ? …. you give such delicious food away !!!!!!! XXXX

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    1. My family and friends call me Mother Nature. Guess I just come by it naturally.

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  4. Donna - your home just could not be more different to mine - we really do live on opposite sides of the world.

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    1. That's why I love blogging. Like pen pals, but get to see different places.

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  5. Oh my, what a handsome guy! NOT. Those snapping turtles often show up in our creek, I am sorry to say that the large ones will kill ducks, so I agree that they are MEANIES. You are so very kind to give those guys your precious raspberries, I could never part with my raspberries! I do love most turtles, specifically the large box turtles we often find.

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    1. Oh Jeri, I do understand. Nature can be cruel. My husband's family used to run over them and shoot them thinking them bad for fish. Berries were mushy.

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  6. We have two box turtles that winter indoors but are in an enclosure for their protection from raccoons in the warm season. Back in 1984 we took our oldest to a turtle expert and she said that she was between eighty and ninety years old, she is doing well and going strong at over 100. The other one is a young buck of 60+.

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    1. OMG Doc. That is interesting. I've seen where animals chew on their shells. The shells actually bleed. So glad you are a good caretaker of your turtles.

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    1. I didn't get a picture with its neck fully out. It is disgusting looking.

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  8. Donna, you've got some fabulous wildlife close up views there! I am wondering just how many other turtles have the same diet as yours.

    Over here, there are some very large turtles who dwelling in the Lake in Central Park, and also in ...Turtle Pond. I don't remember ever seeing them come out of the water, though.

    Thanks for sharing these pictures...and the leftovers. xo

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    1. Well that is interesting Frances. I did not know turtles lived that far north. One would think they would be very friendly city turtles with so many people around, unlike my country turtles. They are probably just used to me.

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  9. Oh, Donna! I'd help you feed your babies every day! We had Sheldon, a dry-land fellow---a spur-thighed tortoise (whose view from the back was indeed horrendous, all spurs and thorns and leg-armor, and just that close-up could have been put to good use in any Warrior Movie). He and his people-family lived with us for a year and a half---them upstairs and him down here, mostly on the slate floor of my kitchen.

    He was such a sweet fellow, who grew from dinner-plate size to that-platter-that-came-with-the-Mikasa during his time here, on lots of green things and fruit, chopped fine in his own tee-ninecy cup-sized Cuisinart. And he simply adored a scoop of warm brown rice---he'd not raise his head til the last grain was gone. He'd eat his breakfast, then make his way out and around breakfast room, dining room, way over across past the bath to our room, where he'd circle to the other side of our big water bed, wedge his head close close and sleep all day except for a little outdoor jaunt. Our sidewalk walks down the blocks caused a lot of traffic-stop, as well.

    He'd also graze the back lawn, encircling it inside the fence beneath an enormous blue laundry basket, nipping grass and clover in the sun. I could keep track of his progress just by watching for the basket to ease across the lawn.

    r
    Yes, that's Caro's living room upstairs---a long cool soothing room with a sweet sitting area at the other end, and a little table where she invites us up for brunch or dinner every week.

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  10. Rachel, you're the third person that has/had turtles. I am surprised by that. When we were young, they sold baby turtles with painted shells as pets, but stopped long ago due to salmonella possibilities. Guess that's where it all started going south. Laws for everything now. They are interesting creatures. Have different personalities. I try to stay back away from the snappers since they won't let go till thunder/lightning strikes :)

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  11. Rather you than me - ugly brutes aren't they

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    1. They really are Elaine. Nothing cute about them. I did have a smile this evening when one picked up a peach from the edge and turned it fanny to me and waddled back in the pond with that alligator tail dragging behind it.

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