"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

"Gather ye rose-buds while ye may." Robert Herrick

Hello Friends!

Friends, Romans, countrymen...y'all. Foodies, gardeners, artists and collectors - let's gather together to share and possibly learn a thing or two in the mix.

Donna Baker

Thursday, August 6, 2015

Dust To Dust


I've had this textile for some time now.  I don't even know if it is Japanese or Chinese.  As you can see it is disintegrating.  


It was nearly impossible to photograph.  I took it outside for the light, but feared it blowing away in bits.  The 'thread', silk I am certain, is finer than a human hair.  It seems to be bonded somehow to a paper like backing, then attached to some kind of board.  Notice the white paper with the silk attached to the right of her chest.


There was a boy beside her.  Notice the background of a stairway to the right and stone walls and pavers on the ground.


The upper left is beautiful with it delicate florals.  What I thought were flames must in fact be drapery of some kind.  Did they even use drapery back then?


Their little shoes and dress should tell where they are from.


Again, my limited camera skills and no knowledge of how to photo shop etc. can't show much more than I have shown.  Can't imagine how someone made this so long ago.  So sweet, but sad it won't last long.

33 comments:

  1. It's absolutely beautiful Donna. It's such a shame that these textiles disintegrate but they are so delicate and I don't think that there's much that you can do about it, although an expert might know how you could preserve it. Do you think that you could use it in some way ? It would be a shame to put it away…. it needs to be on display, doesn't it ? XXXX

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    1. Out here in the heartland of rural America, it would be impossible to find anyone to preserve it. I bought it at a flea market long ago in Tulsa. I'd love to give it to someone who would love it. I just keep it in a plastic bag in a bedroom. I do think about the person/s who made it. Unimaginable work that must have gone into it.

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  2. I do hope someone can help you identify the origin by the children's clothing. I wish more of the boy's cap/hat were distinguishable. Does the picture seem printed on the cloth, as opposed to woven in. It looks like the former to me.

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    1. Joanne, I don't know how to tell. Would they have printed with inks/dyes long ago? I know nothing of the printing process.

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  3. How sad that it is gradually disintegrating Donna - it looks so beautiful.

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  4. I agree that I cannot imagine how someone made this textile years ago. A thing of beauty.

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  5. Donna, thank you for taking time and care to share these photographs of a beautiful textile picture. It really is exquisite. Though this might sound odd, there is something about the composition and drawing of the figures and flowers that reminds me of the work of Carl Larsson.

    xo

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    1. I was just rummaging around in the guest bedroom and looked where I keep things I sell at my etsy site and saw this little piece. I do remember buying it but wondered why.

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  6. How lovely and tragic and so evocative of another time. Is it possible that this is a photograph on silk? It's so exquisitely done, with such minute, elaborate details. I just looked up Photos on Silk, and found one on a restorer's website.

    http://jayneshrimpton.tumblr.com/post/31981240323

    I'll bet she'd love to see it.

    rachel

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    1. Rachel, I know nearly nothing about textiles, but wonder if this is the original silkscreen paintings on silk. I think it is that rather than an original weaving or photograph image. Thank you for the info.

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  7. I have something very similar Donna..it was my mom's..it's in a frame..but mine looks more like a photo on silk?

    But all slk..I love it..a mother looking over her baby's cradle..
    I cannot make out the artists name in full..just Taylor..I don't know if it's painted on..fine fine fine..maybe W.L.Taylor

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  8. I just found WL Taylor..could very well be..thanks for inspiring me to seek;)

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    1. Monique, I'm flabbergasted that you found a signature. Send me a picture of yours. It sounds lovely.

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    2. I will ..will take a pic today..it's small..wish I knew more about it..

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  10. A few years ago, I found two pieces of Art at a thrift store. They are also on silk and like yours were deteriorating. I didn't pay much for them, so I decided to try and repaint in the missing areas. Surprisingly, they turned out quite well and have held up. Yours is quite beautiful, and with your talent.....maybe it could be saved.

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  11. Hello.

    Her hairstyle. Next to the boy's hat. Shoes.
    They looks like Japanese.

    However, I can not conclude.

    Have a good weekend. From Japan, ruma❃

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    1. Oh Ruma, thank you very much for the info.

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  12. This is surely a piece of fabric with a history - I bet it was beautiful when first woven/embroidered. Such a shame that it is disintegrating - dust to dust is appropriate.

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  13. What an amazing treasure. Glad your friend Ruma was able to identify its ethnic origin!

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    1. Yes , I hope Ruma will take it. Would love for it to go back home to Japan.

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  14. Dear Donna- what an interesting textile. I have never seen anything like this. Where did you find this if I may ask? Thanks for sharing.

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    1. At a flea market Debbie. Don't know why I bought it though. Must have thought I could sell it or something.

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  15. What a lovely old textile...enjoy it as long as you can!
    Nice finding your fine blog too!
    Have a great week...

    Titti

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    1. Thank you so Titti. Going to look at yours now too.

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  16. Don't know why, but all my replies seem to be typing themselves in twice. Hope my blog isn't starting to mess up again.

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  17. I've got an old textile in a similar state of decay, also mounted on a board. That may have been standard practice at the time. I am afraid to touch it. Yours could even be Russian because of the hat, shoes and coat.

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    1. I do know that Russia and China have nomadic tribesmen that resemble the child, but my Japanese friend, Ruma (see above) thinks it is Japanese.

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  18. I forgot to ask you how you nearly lost your toe to a wasp?!!

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    1. I wish I could post a picture, but it would so gross everyone out. It took two months to go away; the entire toe was like a giant blood blister that finally had to peel away. It is still discolored. Needless to say, I kill all those red wasps I see now.

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